Chase Bank Swift Code For International Wire Transfers

Are you looking for the Chase Bank Swift Code? Are you looking for the Chase Bank BIC Code? Swift coding is a critical component of international and domestic wire transfers. Bear in mind that Chase Bank utilizes distinct quick codes for its many financial services and locations.

 

 

Wire transfer is the quickest method of receiving funds from your bank account. Once the sender receives your information, including your Chase Swift code. The sender will begin the transfer using the information you provide.

Swift Code For Chase Bank Wire Transfer

Chase bank quick codes for international and domestic transfers are shown below. This code is used by banks to communicate with one another in order for the transfer to occur. It assists in arranging for transactions to occur.

 

Chase Swift Code For International Transfer

Use this code to receive money to your chase bank account from people outside USA.

Bank Name : JPMorgan Chase Bank NA
SWIFT/BIC Code for JPMorgan Chase Bank NA: CHASUS33
Routing Transit Number: 021000021
Bank address, City & State : JPMorgan Chase Bank NA
270 Park Avenue,
New York, NY 10017
(regardless of where your account is located)
Beneficiary Account Number : Your complete JPMorgan Chase Bank NA account number
(including leading zeros)
Beneficiary Name: The name of your account as it appears on your statement

 

Chase Swift Code For Domestic Transfer

 

Use this code to receive money to your chase bank account from people within USA

 

Bank Name : JPMorgan Chase Bank NA
Wire Transfer Routing Number : 021000021
Account Holder Name : Your Name
Account Number : Your Bank Account Number
Bank Address, with City & State: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA
270 Park Avenue,
New York, NY 10017
(regardless of where your account is located)

 

Chase Bank Wire Transfer Transaction Fee

International Incoming $15 for each transaction
Outgoing $45 for each transaction (if made at branch)
$40 for each transaction (if made through chase.com)
Domestic Incoming $15 for each transaction
Outgoing $30 for each transaction (if made at branch)
$25 for each transaction (if made through chase.com)

What Is Swift Code

Swift codes or BIC codes are alphanumeric codes that banks use to identify themselves during international money transactions. These are the codes that banks use to execute international transfers, ensuring that your money reaches the intended recipient. Swift codes are used to send and receive money internationally.

Swift and BIC codes are frequently used interchangeably (Bank identifier code). Swift codes are all 11 or 8 characters in length. The 11-digit number identifies a particular bank branch, whereas the 8-digit code identifies the bank’s headquarters. The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication manages and issues Swift codes (SWIFT).

Now that you understand what a swift code is, you know that it is used to identify your bank branch when initiating an international wire transfer. If you live in Canada and wish to transfer money to someone in the United States of America. You’ll need the receiver’s bank’s swift code. This will assist in identifying the account to which the funds are being sent.

Swift codes assist you in avoiding incorrect transfer destination information when performing an international wire transfer. It guarantees that your money is deposited in the appropriate account (gets to the right receiver). I hope I have satisfactorily addressed your question, “What is a Swift Code?”

How Does Swift Code Look?

The following is a detailed examination of what a swift code looks like. It has 11 characters, yet they are occasionally just 8 characters. I’ll use 11 characters as examples on this page. The following is an example swift code.

AAAABBCCDDD

It is divided into the following sections:

AAAA-BB-CC-DDD

Part 1: The first four characters “AAAA” denote the global presence of the bank (institution). This is consistent across all of their bank branches.

This portion of the swift code denotes the nation in which the bank is located.

Part 3: This section depicts the bank branch’s location.

Part 4: This component is unique to the bank branch that accepts the funds. No other bank will use the identical code in this section. It varies by bank.

Swift vs IBAN

You may be wondering why IBAN is required. Is it dissimilar to swift code? IBAN comes into play depending on the destination of the funds. Consider this: If you’re leading someone to a building, quick codes will act similarly to a footpath or road path. While IBAN will assist the location in securing an apartment within the complex.

IBAN is an abbreviation for international banking account number. It is used to designate a particular bank account inside a financial institution. It is not utilized by all nations; for example, IBAN is necessary for transfers to countries in Europe but not for payments to the United States of America.

Swift vs. BIC

I used the acronym BIC above to describe the meaning of swift code. I’m sure you’re wondering how they’re connected. Swift and BIC codes are identical. The abbreviation BIC refers to business identifying code.

Is a Bank’s Swift Code Consistent Across All Locations?

“NO” is the answer to this question. Each bank branch is assigned a unique swift code. This quick code is unique and serves as a means of identifying the bank branch that will receive the funds you are transferring.

Prior to initiating an international wire transfer, it is critical to verify the code required by your bank.

 

 

What Does A Swift Code Look Like?

Below is an in-depth analysis of what a swift code looks like. It contains 11 characters, sometimes they are 8 characters. On this page, I will be using 11 characters as examples. Below is an imaginary swift code.

AAAABBCCDDD

It can be broken down to these sections:

AAAA – BB – CC – DDD

Part 1: The first four characters “AAAA” identifies the bank (institution) global presence. This is the same for all their bank branches.

Part 2: This section of swift code, represents the country where the bank is located.

Part 3: This part represents the location of the bank branch.

Part 4: This section is peculiar to the bank branch receiving the money. No other bank will have the same code in this part. It varies from bank to bank.

Swift Codes Vs IBAN

You might be asking what the need for IBAN? Is it different from swift code? IBAN comes to In-play depending on where you are sending the money to. Think of it this way – you are directing someone to a building, swift codes will guide the person just like a pathway or road path. While IBAN will help the place locate an apartment in the building.

IBAN is an international bank account number. It is used to identify a specific bank account in an institution. It is not used by all countries, example: You will need IBAN to make transfers to countries in Europe but not required for payments to USA.

Swift Code Vs BIC

I used BIC above when I was explaining the meaning of swift code. I know you have been wondering how they are related. Swift codes and BIC are the same. BIC stands for Business identifier code.

Is Swift Code of A Bank Same for All The Branches?

The answer to this question is “NO”. Each bank branch has its own swift code. This swift code is unique to identify the bank branch that will hold the specific money you are sending.

It is always important to check the code required by your bank before making an international wire transfer.